Thursday, January 5, 2012

An Old Suit

I  took lots of photos and have many museum stories to share and from time to time I will blog about some of my experiences. 

When something comes into the historical museum as a donation, it needs approval to stay.  I can approve some things..some things sit around my office until enough board members have been by to vote one way or another.  It is a pain in the neck..I have a very small office that I share with the gift shop.

This quilt was donated.

IMG_6353

I accepted it right away because we have nothing similar to it.  It is made from Men’s Suits.  If you look closely you can see suits from church long ago.  I knew right away that I had a perfect spot for it.

I filled out the paperwork. All donated items are called accessions..they are assigned a number. The number is marked on the item with a special pen.  The people that donate items receive a copy of the paper work and a thank you letter.  I photograph  everything..the museum has no camera..but I donate mine for the photography work.  The accession is then entered into a fancy smancy museum inventory program.  Nothing leaves my office until the paperwork has been filled out and a photo has been taken.

IMG_6359 The quilt ended up in an antique wheelchair in the Military Room..little boys like to sit in this chair..now it may not be so inviting.  There are three chairs that can be used in this room..most times elderly men or women will sit in this room and just relax and look around.

When I have about ten accessions to record I begin the computer work..usually on a day when I know it is going to be quiet..and before our monthly meeting.  Accessions are part of what I report about during those meetings.

Many museums have a room where their accessions are stored until they go out for display.  Sometimes things need small repairs..a nail in a frame or some supporting documents attached.  For me all this happens in my office…sometimes my desk looks like a disaster area.

I was in my office the other day..I dropped off some catalogues and some research files that I had finished with.  It was colder in the building than it was outside.  My boots were a little snowy..I slid across my office floor..it was like a skating rink.  I was real happy to lock up and leave:)

Blog Signature

27 comments:

  1. That is a beautiful quilt, Far Side.

    Glad to hear you only slid, too!

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a grand old quilt. The bright ties make an otherwise plain quilt a stand-out. I don't envy your cold weather. When I lived in MN, I got so cold that it took 5 years of living in Phoenix to thaw out.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Brrr! Sounds cold in that room. The quilt is good for its historical value, but it looks like kind of depressing to me. I like my quilts with lots of color. Old suits were anything but! It's very interesting, though. I like where you put it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very interesting old quilt. That looks like the perfect spot for it. Glad you didn't hurt yourself when you slipped.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That quilt is amazing! So creative!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great donation and great display..
    I love old quilts....
    Enjoy

    ReplyDelete
  7. You jogged my memory about one of those quilts that I have. I had never figured it out to be cloth from men's suits. Mine, if I still have it, I hate getting old and forgetting, was made from rectangular suit samples and the stickers were still on the back of some of the samples. The quilt top was never finished. Gosh I hope I didn't toss it and that it is still up there on the very top shelf. I like seeing the museum.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Burrrr, the room sounds like a freezer!!! I'd get out quick too!

    What a wonderfully unique old quilt and I do believe you found the perfect spot for it!

    Your job sounds quite interestin' and how much you enjoy it come through loud and clear through your writin' sweetie.

    God bless ya and enjoy your day my friend!!! :o)

    ReplyDelete
  9. In "the old days" nothing was wasted and this quilt from mens' suits sure is interesting.

    Your telling about the museum's activities is very interesting. You are doing wonderful things for that place.

    ReplyDelete
  10. It's wonderful. There are a couple of ladies in our community that will take a bunch of clothes after someone dies and make the family a quilt out of them. Sounds morbid but the family can cover up under familiar fabric that has become a keepsake if nothing else out of clothing that would have gone to the dump or Sally Ann.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What museum is that? I just started following you so I'm not familiar with it. I know you live in MN and I too am glad you didn't fall when you slid across that floor!
    I wonder if you could wash that quilt being of suit material? I'll have to ask at my quilt guild as the thrift store always has men's suits and that might be a good "green" project. Material is VERY expensive now a days. Love the museum but I'd turn the heat up if I were you! LOL!

    ReplyDelete
  12. It is a wonderful piece of work. And talking of wonderful work, what wonderful work you are doing keeping these objects - and the history they represent - alive. A very happy new year to you, your family and your museum colleagues.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love the quilt!
    I have always been intrigued with museums and how they operate. When I've visited the Smithsonian I often get lost in thought about all the storage rooms, repair shops, etc. I'd love a behind-the-scenes tour. Well... thanks, I'm getting a tour of your museum, and it's as fascinating as ever - even if it is just slightly smaller than the Smithsonian!

    ReplyDelete
  14. That quilt is interesting, and you found a good spot for it. Did you ever find out how old it is? I magnified the picture and didn't think it looked very old, or not very worn anyway:)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Sam I am, I am the Director of the local Historical Society Museum. The building has no heat and no air conditioning..so it is a bit difficult to turn the heat up.
    IF I were making a quilt of suiting material..I would wash all the suits first..so that the quilt would then be washable..since I am not a great sewer I probably would pass on that quilting project:)

    ReplyDelete
  16. Karen, I "think" it was made in the 1960's if I remember correctly..it was never used and stored away in a trunk:)

    ReplyDelete
  17. My mother had a quilt very similar to that one made out of her father's suits from the 20s and 30s. The quilt wore out years ago, but I remember it had a wool batt between the layers and was very heavy and comforting on a cold day. Even today, I sleep better when the blankets are heavy.

    It's amazing the museum allows people to sit in the displays. So many times displays are off limits. Kudos to your museum for making items more accessible.

    ReplyDelete
  18. The quilt looks perfect in that spot, and serves a purpose as well. Very clever. I was holding my breath while reading...very glad you didn't fall. There's already too much of that going around!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Love the quilt and perfect spot to deter little behinds. ;)
    I hate when you have snow on the bottom of your shoes or boots and go sliding on slick floors. Or in your stocking feet--same thing--LOL! Glad you stayed upright. :)

    ReplyDelete
  20. I was wondering who has that many old suits to turn into a quilt. It makes sense if they were donated, that would be a good idea.

    One of my grandmothers made a quilt out of ribbons from funeral flowers. I know... morbid, right? She collected the real cloth ribbons after the flowers were pitched into a big pile after a clean up. MY sister had it for a while but I think she got rid of it. Who wants to cuddle up with that?

    ReplyDelete
  21. What a unique quilt I love it ! Wonderful post and photos ! Have a great day !

    ReplyDelete
  22. That is beautiful and you put it in the right spot!

    ReplyDelete
  23. I also love old quilts. Here in Kansas another name for a tied quilt with no actual "quilting" on it is a comfort or comforter.

    I always like that name because they really are a comforting thing!

    marlu

    ReplyDelete
  24. I'm glad you didn't fall!!!

    Linda
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

    ReplyDelete
  25. Great that you display all your museum artifacts. Our museum has a huge storage area. there's far more in storage than is on display. They are touchy about the climate in the storage area. If it's not up to par "No money from grants."

    ReplyDelete
  26. That quilt probably kept someone quite toasty with that suit coat fabric. It looks like it is in excellent shape.
    You have an eye for displays, too. I see where you daughters gets it from.

    ReplyDelete
  27. My grandma Grace made quilts just like that. I had a similar one on my bed when I was a kid.I can remember there being a few squares of shiny material that my fingers would always rub. Knowing what I know now???... I would certainly have saved it. She also made rugs by tying rags together. I think my brother still has one of those hanging on his wall somewhere.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by! I appreciate your comments! If you have a question I will try to answer it here. Connie