Friday, January 9, 2015

Bloom Where You Are Planted

Years ago when we had the greenhouse I kept perennials outside after the main greenhouse was closed for the summer.  It extended our selling season.  That was also back when we had display gardens that were weed free. ( Now called the wild gardens) That was what we did …we weeded.  Trying to keep the woods and weeds at bay was a struggle. ( We closed the Greenhouse Business in 2008 due to the economy and Far Guys Trigeminal Neuralgia.)

Every few weeks one of us would whack off a wild rose that wanted to grow right next to one of the display racks.  It loved that spot…one day I dug down and dug the roots out.

Wild Roses two

As you can see I was a failure. Apparently it liked root pruning.

Wild Roses

They bloomed beautifully last June and then sporadically until Fall.

Wild Roses three

We don’t do anything for them…no fertilizer…no water…no TLC… however we have stopped digging up the roots!Rose Hips in Winter

Rose Hips in Winter. 

So it there a lesson in all this?  Maybe…wherever you are whatever happens to you even if someone hacks off part of your roots…bloom and someday your beauty will be appreciated.

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25 comments:

  1. Those are some very wise words! The flowers sure are pretty. Have a great weekend and stay safe and warm.

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  2. I've always loved that saying! That wild rose is as pretty as any store bought one.

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  3. Beautiful flowers. Your last comment is so much easier to say than do, but it's soooo true. Thanks for the reminder.

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  4. That's a good reminder to just keep on blooming' as life throws its slings and arrows my way. I love that last rose hip shot especially. :-)

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  5. I love the looks of that wild rose and sure glad that despite your attempts to get rid of it, it still blooms.. Do the birds eat the rose hips?

    Shirley H.

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    1. In the spring they do, Chance also likes them but they are a natural laxative so we discourage him from eating them:)

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  6. So very true!

    My mother had a similar Wild Rose bush. I loved it.

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  7. Wild roses have the most heavenly scent.
    A few years ago i got some roots of a Martin Frobisher rose that they were pulling out of our churchyard as it was taking over the small flower garden. They looked like a couple of dried up old sticks, but I planted them and lo and behold they grew abundantly. I prune it every spring to the height of 4 ft and every year it tops out around 8-9 ft. I have whacked of chunks of it's roots for friends and now they too have abundant roses. You just can't keep a good rose down!

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  8. I like your story. That rose is as tough as any prairie plant.

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  9. Here in Oregon green stuff grows everywhere. We're not big garden people, so every year we have to pull out the many "volunteer" plants that sprout in our yard. But I'd definitely keep that lovely rose bush of yours!

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  10. I love the lesson of your rosebush! And the roses, too. You have to be pretty tough to make it through Minnesota winters!

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  11. You just keep what I've always known, you are a very wise lady!

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  12. I never thought of this but do they grow from seed or root propagation like quack grass?

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    1. You can grow them from the seed inside the hips, or by grafting, cuttings or root division:)

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  13. Mine mostly died out the summer before with the drought. I had very few blooms this past summer but it is sprouting up again. Your dormant rose looks just like mine but yours is larger. Mine actually came from my then property in Minnesota as I didn't have a good source to find it in Iowa. I saw the same rose growing very large and healthy next to a light house up in Maine. It was far enough away from the salt water that it did well. I am assuming moisture in the air made it grow well.

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  14. The kind of plants I love, that do well with no assistance. It's a beautiful rose.

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  15. Lovely to see this time of year, love the rosehips. Blessings Francine.

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  16. What a nice thing to see this bleak time of year!

    Linda
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com/?s=The+Adventures+of+Fuzzy+and+Boomer&submit=Search
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

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  17. Now that makes winter more bearable!

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  18. My hubby tends our roses, he feeds them, mulches them, etc. They do quite well.

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  19. There's a real lesson there about having the flexibility to seek out the place that is naturally nurturing to you, as well. That's a real talent. Says a lot for determination, too :)

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  20. The birds will love those rose hips...or you could make tea.

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  21. Yeah, your advice seems to be what I have done indeed. Life hacked my roots to smitherines and so I just flourished with what was left with where I was. Not sure I turned out as good lookin' or as happy as your rose, but hopefully I am as content. There is nothing that delights my heart more I think than rose hips in the snow. I may in fact have more rose hips in the snow pictures than any one other item, maybe not, but close.

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Thanks for stopping by! I appreciate your comments! If you have a question I will try to answer it here. Connie