Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Spot in the Road

One of my favorite spots to stop and take a photo is right here.

Spot in the road

I can see the lay of the land.  The different crops planted and the road with the hills in the distance.  This is the road that leads home.  I like it when there is no traffic! Standing in the middle of the road is an awesome feeling..almost powerful especially if I have my camera.  There was a sign out in the field near the approach where I parked.

Remember those long French Fries in the box that I talk about?  They came out of this field.

Chemicals in the soil Sept 29

The chemical stench burned my eyes and nose.  The smell was terrible..they are the stinkiest of neighbors.

They use something to fumigate the soil to kill something..not sure what..but it must be some powerful crap.

Vantage point with a memorial

Just so there is a record for all of posterity this is the view to the east.  The first photo was a view to the west.

Sometimes I wonder about the Deer that wander through these fields.  What do you suppose is the effect on the deer..and if you are a deer hunter is this important to you?   Was there some “study” done on the effects of animals passing through..grazing in adjacent areas?  Last I heard deer do not read signs:(

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22 comments:

  1. I have never thought of how nice photos of the road can be...Funny how deer do not read signs

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  2. I do wonder about fumigating fields that size and the effect on the wildlife. I like that first shot with the rolling road and the sun shining on the asphalt.

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  3. Beautiful shots. I never thought about photographing a road - cool. Maybe this is why more deer are getting Chronic Wasting Disease and other sicknesses - they don't read signs.

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  4. Scary what chemicals are infiltrating our world, hopefully the deer can sense its not good for them and find another path.

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  5. The deer here can read, they just won't obey those "deer crossing" signs. ;) There is no worse smell than those chemicals - what are we doing to ourselves?

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  6. You'd think there would be some sort of systemic contamination for the deer if they go through the field.
    The poisons we use are darn scary. There are so many unintended consequences; think back to DDT.
    I wonder what kids (in whatever shape they take) thousands of years from now will know about our population and what we did to ourselves and the Earth?

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  7. I feel sorry for the deer and any other animal that might cross these fields. Very frightening.

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  8. Many years before I remember they used strychnine to treat the cotton crops. My aunt years long after cotton had ground planted a garden there. We were visiting and Aunt Chloe was excited about her crop of potatoes. As Mom peeled and prepared them, she could detect the poison in the potatoes that remained in the soil.

    It is scary when you think about the chemical tracks we leave.

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  9. PS: I feel the power in this spot. Like the pictures.

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  10. Not only deer but all wildlife are affected by these chemicals. Can't science find a way to be rid of pests, but also preserve our earth?
    Peace,
    Muff

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  11. Love your photos . I wish there was something other then chemicals farmers could use on their fields . Have a good day !

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  12. Thank God the organic movement is expanding, but I wonder if these gigantic corporations will ever get on board.
    There is probably not a living thing in that dirt. The true organic farmers are all about building up the soil into a wonderful living entity, not blasting it with chemicals until everything is dead.
    It truly scares me what some people are doing to our planet.

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  13. Sadly, corporations and corporate farms are changing the world. It's economics that power our world rather than common sense.

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  14. A road...a metaphor for many different things You have made an interesting photo of your favorite road.

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  15. From what I have read, we should be avoiding any potato that isn't organic, which puts most of them out of our reach because of the cost. Sprayed from before they are planted, to after harvest, they are full of pesticides. We did grow our own this year, but there is a limited amount.

    Love the road, and I noticed that you got out of the car to take the photos, lol.

    Jen @ Muddy Boot Dreams

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  16. Our family jokes about what we call "potato poisoning." My husband, the good ol' Irish boy with all those Irish roots, can't eat potatoes. He recently discovered, thanks to going on an Atkins diet--no carbs ;)--that when he ate potatoes, the next morning, he'd feel like he had a hangover. That's his way of describing it.

    Now that I read your post, I'm beginning to wonder if it is the potatoes that are poisoning him, or the ground itself. What you said kinda makes a soul stop and consider...

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  17. That is one of the things I do miss about the mid-west and that is the ability to see for long distances! Great shots.

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  18. Nice photos.
    I agree though, it is scary what some farms can get away with.
    Have a great week!

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  19. I wonder, too. Do you think they would naturally avoid such a scent? But what about after the worst of the smell is gone? And what about the rain that sinks those toxic chemicals into the surrounding groundwater...and the plants the decide to grow there--for us? Scary, isn't it?

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  20. I suppose there is a beetle bug or some sort that lays it eggs in the soil and they want to kill it before the next crop. I have never thought that Minnesota could grow great potatoes and yet I do remember in the past seeing all the people had them in their gardens.

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  21. Have I mentioned about how potatoes are one of the most heavily poisoned crops? They fumigate the soil prior to planting (mostly for fungus), the potato itself is sprayed or dusted prior to planting, the fields are sprayed several times during growth, then sprayed to kill the growth of the plant so they can harvest, then the potato is treated yet again to enhance its natural storability. Not to mention all the things that are dumped on it again while it is being processed into french fries, hash browns, tater tots, instant mashed potato flakes.... And we wonder why we get a gut ache when we eat them.

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  22. C - Your first picture is the best place on the way to your house to drive real fast and feel the roller coaster in your tummy!!!!! WWWHHHHHHHHHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Thanks for stopping by! I appreciate your comments! If you have a question I will try to answer it here. Connie