Sunday, August 25, 2013

Bunker Hill

Yesterday  the flags were changed out at Bunker Hill.  Bunker Hill is a Vietnam Memorial that was dreamt of and started by a Marine who did a tour in Vietnam.

Bunker Hill overlooks the prairie.  The day was hot but the gale force winds from the south made the day bearable. 

Far Guy and another fellow that served in the Air Force took down the Air Force flag.

Flag Ceremony Bunker Hill Uncle Archie and another fellow put up the new Air Force flag.

Archie and the Air Force Flag

One by on the flags were changed out.  Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, POW ~ MIA and the American flag.

POW MIA Flag

There are still about 2,000 soldiers that have not been accounted for in Vietnam.  It seems that most of them have been forgotten by the government, but not by the soldiers that served with them, or their families. 

Dog Tags

I cannot imagine the not knowing, the wondering what happened to a family member…it must be almost too much to bear.

The flags were not burned today, it was too windy.  They will be properly disposed of when the wind dies down.

Bunker Hill old flags

Many thanks to Howard and Trudy who invite the public to share this day with them.  Trudy cooks for days and a picnic lunch was served after the ceremony:)

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13 comments:

  1. What an awesome way to spend a Saturday! Many thanks to Far Guy and Uncle Achie for their service...

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  2. I come from a military family and have many who have served, and many who still serve. The ceremony of the flags is solemn and poignant. Thank you for sharing it with me, Connie.

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  3. I used to wear one of those POW - MIA bracelets. I still remember my guy's name and the last time I checked he had never been found...

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  4. I would have had a big lump in my throat at that ceremony.

    I couldn't believe the winds yesterday. Some of my outdoor furniture took wing.

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  5. What a wonderful tribute for our armed services. My heart goes out to the families of those MIA. Like you, the 'not knowing' would haunt me.

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  6. A moving and powerful tribute. I cannot imagine the horror of not knowing what happened to a loved one.

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  7. This is a very meaningful ceremony.

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  8. What a wonderful way to honor those who serve and have served. God Bless all of our troops and veterans.

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  9. A great way to honor the armed services. It must be so hard on those whose loved ones have never been found.

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  10. Wonderful post.
    This government can't do much of anything, let alone remember the past.

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  11. What a wonderful tribute.

    I honor all those who have served and are serving. Thank you.

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  12. This brought tears to my eyes. I know a family whose Dad is POW-MIA from Vietnam...they were all tiny children when it happened. The kids are all parents and grandparents (in some cases now) and they still wonder....possibly their Mother knows as she passed over a few years back. I hope they met again...if so, I'm sure there were tears of joy.

    Linda
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com
    http://deltacountyhistoricalsociety.wordpress.com

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  13. Beautiful ceremony. I can't imagine what it must be like to never know what ever happened to a soldier in the family who went off to fight in any of the wars.

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Thanks for stopping by! I appreciate your comments! If you have a question I will try to answer it here. Connie