Friday, September 23, 2016

Mustard Fields Forver

Instead of Strawberries Fields Forever, we escape to the Mustard Fields Forever.

Mustard Field Sep 22

It doesn’t have quite the lyrical quality but if you like yellow you can escape in the color for just a short time…to catch your breath…but I am certain of one thing Strawberry Fields smell a whole lot better than Mustard Fields.

Mustard Fields

I am waiting for them to become truly magical when and IF the Monarchs show up like they did last year.

Last year there was only one field…maybe two…this year every field that grew a crop of peas was planted into mustard after the peas were harvested.  The mustard will be chopped up soon and incorporated into the soil as a natural nematicide which kills nematodes in the soil.  Root Knot Nematodes feed on the roots of potatoes and tubers causing a 60% decrease in production and unsightly looking potatoes.

Just my opinion, tractors and equipment should not be allowed to go from one field to another without being disinfected.   Potatoes should not be left in the fields…they are very hard to pick out of low lying wet areas. Potato vines should not be left in the fields. A longer crop rotation cycle should be observed.

I am glad they are not using the soil fumigants which are very toxic.  I would much rather take photographs of mustard fields than Peligro Signs.

Are you humming along…I bet you will have that ear worm all day…Nothing is real….

Blog Signature

23 comments:

  1. I don't think I've ever seen a field of mustard. Very pretty and I hope the butterflies show up again.
    Wishing you guys a nice weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Those fields are very pretty. Can't wait of the butterflies to show up. Have a nice weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes, darn it! I've got that ear worm going strong. Such beautiful yellow fields. Yellow always makes me think of you. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good stewards of the land practice crop rotation. I'm surprised corporate farmers don't take better care of their livihood, but this is a good start.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sometimes the old ways are best! Pretty yellow in the fields.

    ReplyDelete
  6. A Monarch follow us around yesterday as we were golfing and it was spectacular. I can't even imagine how beautiful those fields would be filled with them.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Fits right in with all the other fall colors. Beautiful! I hope the Monarchs come. I hope you get some good pictures to share.

    ReplyDelete
  8. My brain is in conflict as I hear the song but mustard and strawberry seems not interchangeable. It is causing me to go back into a deep space time warp. That was a long time ago.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm glad you said what they do with fields of mustard. I could not imagine. Here we eat mustard greens, but that is so much. I love the beautiful gold tree in your last post.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Yes, ear worm. But it's a good one. Loved the Beatles. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  11. You're a devil with that song. at least it gets the other song out of my head. One wonders what we're doing to this planet? We do some pretty nasty things to make money

    ReplyDelete
  12. Crop rotation is a good idea. You make some good additional point about how the fields should be protected. But I do wonder why you think potato vines should not be left in the fields.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Because the vines can carry microscopic organisms that you don't want in your field. Just like the potatoes can carry the nematode and innoculate the whole field all over again...and the cycle repeats again and again.:(

      Delete
  13. Fair warning! When someone throws me an earworm, I throw one right back.
    "I could while away the hours, conferrin' with the flowers
    Consultin' with the rain.
    And my head I'd be scratchin'
    While my thoughts were busy hatchin'
    If I only had a brain."
    Looking forward to your monarchs if you get them.
    Happy Friday!


    ReplyDelete
  14. Such lovely fields and photos of them . I bet the Monarchs will love them . Getting chilly here now finally and most of our Monarchs and other butterfly's have gone as have our summer birds but the fall birds have returned already . Thanks for sharing , Have a good weekend !

    ReplyDelete
  15. All we ever see are boring corn fields and soybeans...

    ReplyDelete
  16. Never knew that about mustard plants and nematodes. We have a lot of mustard growing wild in fields around here--only for us, it's in the spring--and it can look gloriously yellow. The bees like it!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I think I need to plant some mustard. My potatoes in one certain area had tiny pin holes nibbled in them. The farmer up the road planted a few crops while he was working to get his hay/daffodil field just how he wanted it.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I figured the mustard was a cover crop, but now I know what value it adds. Interesting. And I hope the butterflies come before the crop is plowed under.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by! I appreciate your comments! If you have a question I will try to answer it here. Connie