Thursday, June 16, 2016

Field Report

We like to look at area fields.  I enjoy the small farmers fields better than the corporate fields.
Steves Corn
Steve’s Corn Field
Steves Peas
Steve’s Pea Field
There are potatoes planted across from us this year.
IMG_4942
Corporate Field
This is the field where the mustard was planted last year.  The mustard was ground up and mixed into the soil.  It is supposed to kill the nematode that is in the soil that messes with the potatoes. I asked “Why do they allow trucks and tractors from one field into the next to spread the nematodes?” The worker that I was talking to didn’t know the answer to that question.  Years ago when I took a Plant Pathology class we put those pretty blue booties on  at the edge of a field and took them off when we came out, they were put into a plastic bag and new booties were issued for the next field. We carried nothing in or out of the fields that way.

Their new practice is to plant peas and to follow it with mustard…I was told it is to be one of their standard practices to control nematodes..I guess it will be better than spraying the entire field with something toxic.
Blog Signature

21 comments:

  1. here you can see fields that are coming long nicely and then down the road are some that are not...strange year

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love looking at the fields as they grow. I too prefer smaller farmers fields over corporate ones. Strange growth season here this year.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I was just wondering the other day about nematodes and what they do. Now I know. Thanks for the info. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for your information about nematodes. I have heard about them but didn't know they caused damage to certain crops. My father (a farmer) used to vary his planting from year to year. He did it to control weeds, but I'm sure it worked for plant diseases too. Farmers have learned a lot through science!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nematodes.... no idea of what they do but it makes me think of toads all dressed up in ganster gear.....

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love those deep green fields!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Steve's fields look as huge as the corporate field. I've never seen such big fields!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Biologic controls are always preferable over spraying chemicals in my book. Minnesota crops are lookin' good!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm afraid that down the road the corporate farm will not be able to produce enough food for us. It will not be profitable.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Ours are wheat fields. And now is time for harvest so there is lots of cutting being done!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Iowa farmers are suppose to rotate the corn two years to one year beans. If they get greedy they just keep growing corn. My neighbor lady's land across the street has beans once in a while but she tells the renter that she doesn't like the looks of bean fields. So it is always corn.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Definitely better than toxic spray!!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. Glad to hear they are using some 'organic' type methods!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Never could understand about nematodes, heard they were in family
    gardens. Corporate was taking over in Arkansas,very few small farms left.

    ReplyDelete
  15. You certainly asked the riight question about the trucks going from one field to the next. It's the same idea as trying to eliminate the spread of eurasian milfoil in the water by NOT taking it to the mpnext body of water. I got hooked on watching the Park Rapids main street webcam for a short time today. :-) I think I will add the link to my blog somI remember to check it when the Christmas tree goes up.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I still like to see fields of crops too, even though I have lived in the city for all but 18 years of my life.
    Crop rotation sounds like a smart idea. I know peas build nitrogen in the soil. Growing mustard is better than chemicals, like you said.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Interesting info and the views are amazing. I love your header photos, too.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Your post had me looking up nematodes. I now know a very tiny bit about them and that there are both good ones and bad. I'm afraid my old brain couldn't take in much more than that.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Lovely photos .We have lots of Amish farms here in our area and they grow all kinds of things and the fields are wonderful I love seeing them in their fields with their horse teams plowing or planting . Thanks for sharing , Have a good weekend !

    ReplyDelete
  20. I never knew this fact about nematodes. Glad to have read this.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by! I appreciate your comments! If you have a question I will try to answer it here. Connie