Thursday, October 8, 2015

Mustard and Monarchs

Yesterday my other baby brother said I should take a photo of the Mustard field with the Smoky Hills in the background…good suggestion…yesterday was cloudy and the light wasn’t too bad…the other alternative would have me getting up at some hour way too early for me.

Mustard and the Smoky Hills

You can see the Aspens (Piss Popple) are turning golden in the Smoky Hills. 

We noticed a number of butterflies in the Mustard Field.

Wings spread Monarch

They seemed to be having a good time feeding.

Monarch in the Mustard

We watched the butterflies for quite some time.  There were some mucky mucks having a meeting out in the field…rumors abound about this field…good, bad and ugly.

I hope the mustard doesn’t show up in all the other fields…or our lawns for the next how many years.  Time will tell. 

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24 comments:

  1. The skies may have been cloudy but I think the pictures turned out quite well. I love the color contrast in the picture of the field with the mountains in the background. Sure hope you don't get that stuff in your lawn.

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  2. So pretty. Lasts blasts of color before it all turns black and white and gray ....

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  3. Now that's a big concentration of yellow, which I believe is a certain person's favorite color. Love the pretty butterflies feeding. :-)

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  4. Ahh but the butterflies are so cool and would guess they are on their way south? It is a pretty field but we too - don't want it in the hay fields or yards!

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  5. At least the butterflies were getting some benefit from the massive field.

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  6. Love the yellow fields! And so wonderful to see butterflies too.

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  7. Is it like an invasive weed? I know it is grown as a soil amendment. Mucky mucks, I thought it was British, but this was sort of interesting http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2008/01/high-muckamucks.html
    The yellow is a perfect backdrop for the butterfly!

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  8. Lovely fields! Lovely!

    Linda
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

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  9. Pretty colour with the butterfly. We have canola fields here that turn yellow like that- and they stink when they are in full bloom!

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  10. Well, this mustard won't go to seed this year. Yes, mucky mucks can really screw things up because they don't know anything.

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  11. Aspens, ha, I like that. I remember when they planted them so the forest could fill up fast so they could cut them down to make paper. It will be interesting to see how the mustard mystery is solved.

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  12. Is it the same mustard that they make our mustard from? Lovely hills! I didn't see one monarch this year....so sad. When I get up North (if I ever do) I am planting a bunch of milkweed for them. They say the Roundup has killed the milkweed and they have little to feed on anymore. I hope they survive!

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  13. Great shots of the butterflies against the yellow!

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  14. Lovely photos . Haven't heard the expression Mucky muck for years to us it is an old Brit expression meaning rich/ snobbery . Thanks for sharing , Have a good day !

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  15. I like the third photo, of the butterfly against the yellow mustard .

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  16. After seeing that photo, I did a double take and scrolled back to check the date you posted this. That's the way the uncultivated fields look around here in the springtime. I take it this was a farmer growing these on purpose ;)

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  17. Love aspens! I will make a special trip to Colorado just to see them change colors in the fall. I don't know what a mucky muck is, but I assume someone/something shady! :)

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  18. The rust colored butterfly is so pretty against all the yellow.

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  19. Well, maybe the monarchs would appreciate all the extra mustard fields. Doesn't sound like most anyone else would. Great photo, though, against the hills. :)

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  20. Is the mustard a planted crop, for harvest, or as a cover crop???I like to know this stuff. I guess you can't take the farm out of this girl.

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Thanks for stopping by! I appreciate your comments! If you have a question I will try to answer it here. Connie