Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Wistful Wednesday: Roots Part Five

My Great Grandfather Isak decided to move his family north from French Lake Minnesota to Toad Lake Township Minnesota. He traveled with two horses, a colt, cook stove, barrel of salt pork, and three small children Marie ( Mary) age nine,  Joe age 7 and Sam (My Grandfather) age 5.  They travelled 170 miles north on wilderness roads, he homesteaded a parcel of land in Toad Lake Township Becker County Minnesota.  He built a 10’ x 10’ home for Margaretta.  She followed by train in October of 1896 with Isacki age 4 and Mikeal age 2.  Isak was late picking her up in New York Mills..and while she was waiting she gave birth to John, he was born October 9, 1896.  Later Levi, Ethel, Esther, Ida, Charles and William would join the family. Twelve children, thirteen if you count Greta Born November 16, 1886 and died December 10, 1886.  It was cold and Margaretta took the baby to bed with her for the night and in the morning the baby was dead.

I have some photos of my grandfather brothers thanks to Verniel. ( Her Father Joe is my grandfathers  brother.)Grandpa sam Yliniemis Brothers and friend Left to right Lars Johnson  then levi Charley Joe and Bill Yliniemi

Lars Johnson a friend, Levi, Charlie, Joe and Bill my grandfathers brothers.

Joe Yliniemi  Andrew Leinonen Sam Yliniemi

Joe (Grandpa’s Brother) Andrew Leinonen (Uncle to them and  a half brother of their mother ) and Sam  (My Grandfather)

Ike Y Matt Leinonen and Sam Yliniemi 1946

1946  Ike (Grandpas Brother), Matt Leinonen (Uncle to them and half brother of their mother ) and Sam (My grandfather.)

They were salt of the earth men.  I remember Great Uncle Ike and Great Uncle Mike the best, perhaps because my parents used to visit them sometimes on Sunday.  The rest are just vague memories of very tall men that looked a bit like my grandfather.

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16 comments:

  1. I love all the old photos and stories. Brings back so many memories

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  2. Looks like Chance's great-great-grandparent is in one of the photos.

    Rugged men - they look like they were hard workers.

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  3. Thirteen children. I cannot even imagine. It's wonderful to have those pictures to remember them by, though. They all have the same look about them, you can tell they are related. :-)

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  4. Wonderful pics, don't you just love them? I'm like DJan, 13 kids, really??? My grandparents on my dad's side both came from families of 10. The farmers needed lots of kids to help with the work on the farm!

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  5. Your great-grandmother was a brave woman.
    One of the best things about blogs is the opportunity to share these stories - and pictures - from our past. It extends our memories of these people who were in our lives and spreads them through new people who stop to consider them.

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  6. Those were tough times with tough people surviving. I can't say that Minnesota has much of a friendly climate when you are out and about in the winter. It is hard to believe they all but one did survive. The moving had to be difficult with no house there when you arrive. My mom's parents were poor and they moved from vacant houses year after year. My mom said that she was never in the same school for over a year. I expect when the rent was due my grandfather moved on. He was that kind of guy.

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  7. Enjoyed the post so much as always your Wednesday posts. Great pictures, Francine.

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  8. thanks for sharing such a special part of your life with us. great pics. i love b&w photos. they do look like industrious, strong, compassionate, sensitive men. cheers!!

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  9. I love all the unusual names. A 10' x 10' home, and I'll bet she was glad to get moved in. That makes my little house sound big.

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  10. What great photos and interesting info.

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  11. Great to know your roots. Nice photos.

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  12. I was wondering if those were particularly tall men. They sure looked like it.

    And Iggy, I saw that comment about Chance's "ancestor." I was wondering about that, too!

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  13. I'm glad, as a woman, that I wasn't living back then. Thirteen kids...oh my....Somehow I doubt that was the woman's choice.

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  14. I'm sure there are many similar family stories, but taking a train to the middle of nowhere, no one to pick you up, two small kids in tow, giving birth among strangers -- this is hard to fathom! You come from strong stock, Farside!

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  15. Poor little baby. People had bigger families (no birth control and they needed help on the farms) and they were lucky all the rest survived. Hardy stock. ;)

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Thanks for stopping by! I appreciate your comments! If you have a question I will try to answer it here. Connie